Lecture Series: The History, Development, and Use of Essential Tools From 1,000,000 BC - Early 1900s
Mar
13
7:00 pm19:00

Lecture Series: The History, Development, and Use of Essential Tools From 1,000,000 BC - Early 1900s

  • Delhi Park Lodge

Join us to learn about the history, development, and use of tools from 1,000,000 BC to the early 1900s with DHS's own Matt Maley. 

Archaeologists have uncovered tools that were made by humanoids as far back as 2.5 million years ago. Over thousands of years, tools developed to meet the needs of individuals and cultures; progressing from the stone age to the copper age then the bronze age and finally the iron age.   In ancient Mesopotamia, there were tool developments that subsequently were adopted and improved by the Egyptians, Romans, and Greeks.  The Chinese developed and improved many specialized tools, with most tools being developed by all cultures to meet a specific purpose.   Basic designs for many of the essential tools remained similar with some improvement or modification of design to become more efficient and useful.  Many of the tools we used today may be traced back hundreds to thousands of years with only minor changes over time.   Wood working tools were initially rather basic and “primitive” by today’s standards.  However, as societies progressed,  some specialized tool modifications permitted the development from the basic to the more refined tools that permitted the development of useful but “artistic” furniture and the homes that utilized these furnishings.  We will review this progression of tool development with many examples showing this development over eons and compare the ancient with tools that built the homes and other structures of the 19th and 20th centuries.


Lecture Series: Fading Ads of Cincinnati
Feb
13
7:00 pm19:00

Lecture Series: Fading Ads of Cincinnati

  • Delhi Park Lodge

"Hidden down alleyways, on street corners or on the bricks above the cityscape, Cincinnati’s fading advertisements hide in plain sight. These ghost signs still tout their wares and services, remnants of a bygone era. Each sign has a vivid story behind it unique to its era, product and craftsmanship. “Wall dogs” like sign artist Gus Holthaus left their marks on the city. A sign for the Beehive, the club and restaurant at the top of the arena, reminds residents of Cincinnati’s pro hockey team, the Stingers. Not many can remember “the Other Place,” but a hand-painted advertisement still adorns a city wall."
- www.queencitydiscovery.com
Join us at 7 pm February 13, 2017, at the Delhi Park Lodge to learn more! Feel free to bring snacks to share!